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Christian Ethics

Christianity provides a solid foundation for life that helps us respond to moral and ethical issues.

Resources on moral and social issues

The Salvation Army Moral and Social Issues Council (MASIC) provides discussion papers and other material to help people reflect on the intersection of the Christian faith in everyday life.

> visit this area to access these articles

Positional Statements

The Salvation Army publishes Positional Statements on some ethical issues.

> visit this area to read our Positional Statements

When words hurt and hinder

18 Apr | 2016

Part of a series of occasional articles from The Salvation Army’s Moral and Social Issues Council.

Is the world changing before our eyes?

21 Oct | 2015

The refugee crisis in Europe is revealing the shifting face of global poverty. Will we confront the reason for this invasion of the desperate?

Room for refugees?

2 Sep | 2015

With the daily news stories of the misery of thousands of refugees, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed and helpless. Yet there are signs of things we can do, here in New Zealand, if we have the courage to care.

The Bible, the Church and hospitality

24 Aug | 2015

Part of a series of occasional articles from The Salvation Army’s Moral and Social Issues Council.

Providing safety to vulnerable people

28 May | 2015

Territorial Commander, Commisioner Robert Donaldson, asks people to be more intentional in protecting people from abuse.

2 people holding a flower

The Bible, the Church and Dignity

28 May | 2015

Part of a series of occasional articles from The Salvation Army’s Moral and Social Issues Council

a road junction

The Bible, the church and ethics

26 Feb | 2015

An occasional article from The Salvation Army’s Moral and Social Issues Council.

a man peering over his spectacles

The Bible, church and culture

13 Jan | 2015

An occasional article from The Salvation Army’s Moral and Social Issues Council.

a shepherd and his sheep

Spare the rod

24 Nov | 2014

According to Scriptures, the ‘rod’ is not for punishing, but for comforting and guiding. Ingrid Barratt examines a biblical view of authority, and finds that God sides with the powerless.

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